Road Running

Berlin Marathon competition: enter for free to win a piece of history

At the Berlin Marathon last year, history was made as Dennis Kimetto became the first man to run under 2:03, smashing the world record with his 2:02:57 run. Back in second, Emmanuel Mutai also ran faster than the old world record, recording 2:03:13 for what will go down as the most underrated run in history.

Shortly after that momentous race, JumpingTheGun caught up with both Kimetto and Mutai and asked them to sign the official race programme along with their historic times, and now we’re giving fans of JTG the chance to win that little piece of history.

To be in with a chance of winning, all you have to do is 1) predict the winning time of this Sunday’s men’s race and 2) predict the winning athlete (which will be only be used in the event of a tie).

With temperatures in the mid-teens and calm conditions expected, the stage is set for one of the fastest marathons in history. Can this be the sixth time in nine years the world record has fallen on the streets of the German capital? Can one of the Mutais, Geoffrey or Emmanuel, withstand the challenge of London Marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge, or will an unheralded newcomer emerge from the long grass?

To enter, you can tweet us at @jumping_the_gun, send us a message on Facebook or comment on our Berlin Marathon competition post, or alternatively comment underneath this article. All entries submitted up until race time (9am Berlin, 8am GMT Sunday) will be accepted. After that, you’re TOO DAMN LATE.

Let the games begin. Good luck!

Marathon challenge: Aberu Kebede, Gladys Cherono and Anna Hahner at the press conference on Thursday. Image: PhotoRun
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Star billing: Eliud Kipchoge is the leading Olympic hope for Kenya in the marathon. Image via photorun
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Kipchoge on a marathon mission in Berlin: "all sport is about mentality"

Cathal Dennehy

Cathal Dennehy

Cathal Dennehy is a freelance journalist, a once-serious, now-retired athlete who writes for a number of international publications in the running industry. He has won two sports-writing awards, the Peter Ball Memorial Award in Ireland and the Wills Writing Award in the UK. Nationally, he previously worked for the Sunday Tribune, Irish Runner magazine and has written for the Sunday Independent, Irish Independent, the Guardian and The Independent in Britain. He is a regular contributor to Running Times, Runner's World, RunBlogRun and the IAAF website.
His banter levels are often poor, occasionally exceptional.

1 Comment

  1. Paul Ryan
    September 25, 2015 at 9:48 pm — Reply

    2:02:40

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